steel

Today is April Fools day, the first quarter of the year done and dusted. With the new day dawns a new future. I am invigorated and feel strong, for that is what’s needed to set off, on the next leg of our journey – hope.
The past few weeks have been a blurred dance, keeping pace with the constant rhythm of setting things into motion, future projects and exciting travels.
The first is coming on strong! Africa Burn. Packing details are already swirling in my head. Before we know it the road is under our butts, flitting like a black ribbon behind us.
Before then there is still much to do, as always is the case. Standing still allows moss to grow on your heels. Keep moving…
As I was saying last night at an exhibition opening to a friend, the process, the movement, motion and action of making, keeping the momentum has become integral to my creative journey. The actual object or artwork is merely the full-stop to the paragraph of doing. In a way my artistic aspirations have become part of my everyday actions.
Take this writing; I am formulating my thoughts, thoughts about my actions. Conversely these writings feed back into the loop of making, understanding my process. I’m building a feedback loop. Resonating abstract thoughts into physical pixilated words.
Lots of big words and garbled sentence structures don’t necessarily make good art.
This administrative side, of writing and editing, organising and conversing with institutions and people sometimes frustrates me. As soon as I get a gap I run to the studio to commence making. Through this madness and limited time the moments of reflection are short, focused and force me to just make, to use all I have learned before and jump, almost without really knowing how far or deep the waters are from this precipice of the now.
Jump!

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The Silverstone Caricatures are new sculptures currently on show in my solo exhibition, “Air” at Art Lovers 1932.

I have been combining rocks, steel and glass for some time now, consciously giving each element a roll in the theatre of sculptural narrative.
The rock is solid, strong and ancient. It is a part of this silica crust we dwell on with a history exceeding even life, as we know it, by far. In this sense it is telling a story, informing the spectator of the randomness, nae, chaos the cosmos contains.
Lifting the stone and appropriating it for my intended use as an element in a larger story I contextualise the seemingly arbitrary thing that was lying around. I personally feel that the simplicity of this act reveals the power we as humans have, to terraform our environment to suit our desires. This thought echoes throughout human history, from primitive stone tools to modern architecture.
In my latest series of exploits, the “Silverstone Caricatures”, I take this concept even further. Completely covering the stones with silver spray paint I change their ancient history, scars, surface with immediate effect. It almost feels like sacrilege when I spray them… but then again large amounts of earth are torn up and pulverised every minute all over the world. Ironic?
Drilling holes has been part of my larger rock projects which I am continuing with these smaller sculptures. Inserting and bending steel rods I use structural logic to attach my lenses.
Metaphorically the lenses play the roll of sight, of seeing or observing. But, who is observing? Is it the painted rock looking at us or are we scrutinising the rock?
These individual lenses are the pivot point on which my concept hinges. They create the portal between both parties, initiating the narrative and conversation between both observers.
I intentionally use the phenomenon of pareidolia, eliciting a reaction of animating the inanimate, giving it “life” through interaction by the spectator.
It all sounds so serious but as a matter of fact I am having fun. I hope to instil the same emotion of quirkiness and childhood discovery through my sculptures for the spectator that I experience.

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Air – A Solo Exhibition

Air opened last Friday. After many weeks, days and hours everything in my head congealed into physicality. I am happy.
The exhibition was opened by Samuel Isaacs, with wise and positive incantations.
Now there seems to be a hiatus, a break in the process. And it is exactly this process which has become important to me. The process has been a personal journey to fulfil my desire of making, of creating that idea from merely a chemo-electrical impulse lingering inside the cranium into a tangible thing.
All spectators at the opening night were pleasantly engaged within the space. Several patrons said that they loved the interaction, being drawn in and experiencing the within and beyond offered by the contained landscapes and immediacy I created.
Apart from the photographs (which are intended as reference and focal points for the Portals to the subject, “Air”) the spectators themselves played with the Portals lenses, peering and giggling at each other. Another intended spinoff was photography, people taking shots with their digital phones of each other and themselves. Even the chosen format of the photographs and the Portals themselves echo the square shots on Instagram and other social media channels.
The difference though is a sense of immediacy and not the quick consumption of second hand experiences.
Before entering the room an eye peers into the show and sets the scene, to look and experience. A fan moves air which in turn starts moving all the elements inside the exhibition space – photos fluttering and sculptures swaying.
The theme is serious. Air is invisible. It is life sustaining. We forget about it.
Air influences our weather, our quality of life, we all breath it in and exhale, irrespective of our social standing, race, health or age. We even share its molecules with other species and without air nothing living would survive on this planet.
Then why? Why do we neglect to look after it?
My inspiration came during a trip to Dubai last year. I noticed the inside spaces within buildings having a cooler, more comfortable air than outside. My attention was drawn to feeling, experiencing the invisible. I started taking a very conscious interest in ducts and fans. Also the movement of air, inside artificial spaces, and when exiting, outside. I still do.

For those that can, please make a turn past Art Lovers 1932 in Pretoria#AirExhibition will run till 24 Marc 2016

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The Aether is a “classical” element. It is that unattainable stuff that our planet floats in and in which light used to propagate throughout the cosmos.
Aether is also the air of gods, the clear, fresh sky as in Greek mythology. It is the inexplicable Zeug between you and I which we can feel as a breeze caressing our cheeks, but yet cannot see, taste or physically grasp.
Aether has an air of ancient spirituality to it. The age of modern science and analytical experimental research has changed all that. Its etherial meaning has been quantified into joules, knots and wavelengths.
The Aether has been given quantifiable Substance.

This is a pretext in which I have been delving for the past several years, that cusp between science and art, between history and presence, the real and the surreal.

My work explores these aspects of the here and there, consciously wanting the spectator to partake in a first-hand experience through the optical media of glass, juxtaposing our contemporary trend of consuming second-hand information through the battery operated lenses in our hands. (…and maybe even offering an alternative window to the spiritual…)

There also is a trend in my work which refers directly to my personal environment. Living next to an informal settlement with ca. 3000 people housing in tin shacks I am influenced by the immediacy of making due with what one has. I am using parts in my sculptures found around my studio such as rocks, wire, steel and even off-cut shards of glass.

These seemingly worthless objects and materials are reappropriated, given new life. Intervening in each part of the sculpture; by polishing facets or cutting patterns in the glass; straightening steel wires; drilling holes into rocks; I am adding value to the banality of the object. Combining these individual elements I instil a narrative which conforms to my initial concept – the immediacy of experience within our everyday lives.

Each sculpture is an individual step in this visual journey I am on. They are small interventions to rekindle that Aha! moment we all so desperately hunt for, but rarely experience in this thicket of visual overload.

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Blossom.

Go outside and see life emerging from nooks and crannies. It is almost Spring and nature is reactivating, energy’s emerging everywhere and things are blossoming…

 

Blossom is on show at Art It Is for “Upcycle Chic”

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Jozi(Pty)Ltd2015

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Tonight, 02 July 2015, sees the opening of Jozi(Pty)Ltd. at Art It Is Gallery. This is a group sculpture exhibition featuring Lucas Thobejane, Gordon Froud, John Moore and Lothar Böttcher. Several younger and upcoming artists are also taking part in this contemporary collective of creative explorations.

The show will run till beginning August. Please follow this link to Art It Is for more information.

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Halifax Art in Parkhurst is hosting an eclectic art group exhibition.
Participating artists include:
Lynette van Tonder
Gerrie van Tonder
Themba Khumalo
Eric Eatwell
Braam van Wyk
Louise Barnard
Marina Louw
Lothar Böttcher
…and more.

The show will run for a limited time only. A walkabout evening with participating artists will be announced.

Several of new and previous work of mine are represented at this show.

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The first sculptures of the year are coming along nicely. They are for an invitational year long exhibition by the Stellenbosch Outdoor Sculpture Trust. This year’s exhibition is titled “Reflections”, which can refer to literal or spiritual meaning. (More details on the opening etc. will follow)
Their title, “Bullet Proof”, refers to the thick glass panes used in my sculptures. This glass dates from a tumultuous time in South Africa’s history.
These bullet proof panes come from vehicles used for riot control during the early nineties / late eighties, witnessing the stranglehold of apartheid faltering under the uprising to install universal democracy in our country.
Each pane bears testament to those times. In these sculptures they become a symbol of our personal lives, metaphors of being human.
Stone comes from earth, has weight and is ancient.
Steel is strong, malleable and manufactured.
Combining these elements and constructing the sculptures according to human dimensions I want them to “walk” among public life, as we do, reflecting their history and strength; reminding us of the path we have traversed to be right here, right now.

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